#MeToo and #TimesUp Have Started The Conversation

Unless you have been living under a bush, in the outback or you have your own island in the Caribbean you can’t have missed the ubiquity of these two campaigns. They are slightly different. #TimesUp speaks about pay gaps, whereas #MeToo serves to highlight the numbers of women who have been subjected to unwanted attentions.

Thanks to these campaigns, the world (predominantly men in the world) is beginning to get the idea that women are not an object. Nevertheless, we would be wrong if we were to believe these were making things better as a whole. Domestic violence is still an unwanted and unwelcome guest at the party and probably effects as many women. The one thing they all the topics have in common is that the abuses take away women’s voices leaving them either unwilling to rock the boat or simply not heard when they do.

domestic violence speakers

On a positive note the social unacceptability means there is plenty of conversation on the topic. There’s lots more education readily available too. But if women are reluctant to come forward and accuse perpetrators of domestic violence then we have to look hard to find domestic violence speakers.

In the digital age standing up for women in an abstract sense turns out to be a courageous act. We are told that in order to be successful we need social media profiles, but who would have one when it opened them to trolling, threats, verbal abuse and even death threats. Being open to stepping up and putting the case requires a certain amount of chutzpah.

As long as women are judged by what they look like instead of what they think and what they have to say we need these women of great strength – it is a relief they are out there.